Jewish Heritage Europe

Touring the Invisible: The Public Recovery of England’s Medieval Jewish History

2 comments on “Touring the Invisible: The Public Recovery of England’s Medieval Jewish History

  1. The medieval Jewish token is now on display in Winchester’s City Museum.
    There is now a project to raise a life-sized statue of Licoricia of Winchester, England’s most important medieval Jewish woman, outside the library in Jewry Street, near where she lived. Licoricia is mentioned in the Trail, as is her son Asher. Asher is included with Licoricia in the statue, holding her hand.
    Licoricia was one of several significant Jewish women members of Winchester’s community, whose money went towards the Edward the Confessor chapel in Westminster Abbey (where coronations take place).
    The statue is by Ian Rank-Broadley, one of the UK’s top figurative sculptors.
    More information on the project and Licoricia can be found on http://www.licoricia.org.

  2. I am curious about the comment, Although there were some wealthy Jews, mostly they were very poor. How do you know? Also, I believe Asher means Happy, maybe a touch of sarcasm!

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