Calendar

Jan
22
Mon
Jewish Museums Today Study Tour @ POLIN museum
Jan 22 @ 13:00 – Jan 23 @ 15:00

 

Jewish Museums Today 2018

Warsaw // Poland
January 22-23

In January 2018 the Association of European Jewish Museums (AEJM) will organize the 2nd edition of Jewish Museums Today: a 2-day study visit to Warsaw that will focus on communication and marketing of exhibitions with sensitive content, using the exhibition Blood: Uniting & Dividing at POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews as a case study. 

Blood: Uniting & Dividing has been inspired by the exhibition at the Jewish Museum London (2015) dedicated to the meaning of blood in Jewish culture. The Polish edition developed the threads that emerged in London, enriching them with new ideas and objects. It explores the question of blood in its religious, historical and social context. Referring to both tradition and modernity, the exhibition aims at presenting facts and challenging stereotypes, especially those related to Christian-Jewish relations. The exhibition narrative is interspersed with contemporary art works.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

 

Jan
27
Sat
International Holocaust Remembrance Day
Jan 27 – Jan 28 all-day

Numerous commemoration and educational events in various countries. Events are on the Day — Jan. 27, the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz — and also in the days or even weeks surrounding the date.

 

 

 

 

 

Jan
30
Tue
Exhibiting the Shoah in history museums – comparing approaches & sharing experiences @ Brussels, House of European History
Jan 30 @ 18:00 – 20:00

Panel debate – House of European History – Tuesday 30th January – 6 PM

With:

  • Steven Luckert, curator, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, U.S.A
  • Dariusz Stola, director, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw, Poland
  • Veerle Vanden Daelen, deputy general director and curator, Memorial, Museum and Documentation Centre on Holocaust and Human Rights Kazerne Dossin, Mechelen, Belgium
  • Andrea Mork, head curator, House of European History, Brussels, Belgium

Moderator: Nico Wouters, Center for War and Contemporary Society (CegeSoma – State Archives), Belgium.

Languages: English (interpretation in French and Dutch)

Close to the date of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day, this event brings together distinguished representatives of four history museums in Europe and the United States that deal with the Shoah each with their own approach. Whether the history of the Shoah is at the core of the museum’s narrative, or part of a broader story, or whether it is presented in a national context or told from a transnational perspective, the curatorial and interpretative choices can be quite different from one museum to another, and yet they all share similar responsibilities and challenges. 

The panelists will explore questions such as:

What is the role of a history museum in documenting, preserving the memory and teaching about the genocide of the European Jews? All four museums assert their aim to draw on the historical account of what is arguably the main negative reference point of European self-consciousness, to inspire a reflection on contemporary issues and foster mutual understanding among people. How do museums deal with such sensitive history in a way that is both relevant for today and that encourages authentic learning for the visitor?

How do museums deal with such sensitive history in a way that is relevant for today and that encourages authentic engagement and learning for the visitors?

 

 

 

Feb
4
Sun
Jewish Studies Conference, Moscow @ Sefer Center, Moscow
Feb 4 – Feb 6 all-day

 

25th International Annual Conference on Jewish Studies

 

Program will be available January 10, 2018

 

 

Feb
18
Sun
Archaeology and Jewish itineraries in Sicily @ Florence, Tourism & Archaeology Salon (room 4)
Feb 18 @ 10:00 – 13:00

New research on archaeological evidence of Jews in Sicily from Antiquity to the Middle Ages will be presented (in Italian) at the 2018 “tourismA” Salon for archaeology and tourism at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Florence.

Program:

«Ebrei e non ebrei nel territorio di Camarina in età tardoantica»
Corrado Bonfanti sindaco di Noto
Luca Cannata sindaco di Avola
Baruch Triolo presidente Charta delle Judeche di Sicilia
Attilio Funaro presidente Istituto Internazionale di Cultura Ebraica (Palermo)
Giovanni Di Stefano docente Università della Calabria
Angelica Ferrara dottoranda Università di Roma Tor Vergata

«Testimonianze ebraiche di età tardoantica a Noto antica e nel Siracusano»
Lorenzo Guzzardi direttore Polo Regionale di Siracusa per i siti culturali

«Documentazione grafica e fotografica di alcune sepolture giudaiche tra Noto, Rosolini e Modica: un progetto in fieri»
Laura Falesi presidente Archeoclub d’Italia sede di Noto
Giuseppe Libra architetto esperto in rilievo di monumenti antichi

«Applicazioni GIS sul territorio di Avola in periodo romano e tardoantico»
Rosario Pignatello amministratore delegato Consorzio Universitario Mediterraneo Orientale (CUMO)

 

 

Mar
5
Mon
Jewish country house conference @ TORCH, Oxford University
Mar 5 @ 09:00 – 18:00

This workshop aims to establish the Jewish country house both as a focus for scholarly research and as a site of European memory. By focusing on a hitherto unidentified group of country houses – those that were owned, renewed and sometimes built by Jews – we aim to establish the importance of Jewish country houses like Port Lympne Mansion, Schloss Freienwalde, Villa Kerylos and Castello Sonnino as variations of a pan-European phenomenon deserving serious consideration from an academic and a heritage viewpoint.

Jewish country houses have so far escaped systematic study because they do not fit existing paradigms either in modern Jewish history or country house studies. The historiography of European Jewish elites has tended to focus on the grande bourgeoisie in its urban setting and does not consider the role families like the Bischoffsheims, the Bleichröders, the Péreires and the Sonninos assumed through their rural estates, nor the role of Jewish country houses in the self-fashioning of many leading Jewish figures such as Benjamin Disraeli, Ferdinand de Rothschild and Philip Sassoon in the UK, Leopoldo Franchetti in Italy, Walter Rathenau in Germany, and Théodor Reinach in France. Conversely, the literature on country houses, which typically focuses on the landed aristocracy, has paid little or no attention to the existence of country houses and rural estates in Jewish hands, or to the particular challenges this posed in a rural landscape and social context so powerfully shaped by Christianity.

Click here to view the call for papers.
 

Contact name: 
Oliver Cox
Contact email: 
Mar
6
Tue
Jewish country house conference @ TORCH, Oxford University
Mar 6 @ 09:00 – 18:00

This workshop aims to establish the Jewish country house both as a focus for scholarly research and as a site of European memory. By focusing on a hitherto unidentified group of country houses – those that were owned, renewed and sometimes built by Jews – we aim to establish the importance of Jewish country houses like Port Lympne Mansion, Schloss Freienwalde, Villa Kerylos and Castello Sonnino as variations of a pan-European phenomenon deserving serious consideration from an academic and a heritage viewpoint.

Jewish country houses have so far escaped systematic study because they do not fit existing paradigms either in modern Jewish history or country house studies. The historiography of European Jewish elites has tended to focus on the grande bourgeoisie in its urban setting and does not consider the role families like the Bischoffsheims, the Bleichröders, the Péreires and the Sonninos assumed through their rural estates, nor the role of Jewish country houses in the self-fashioning of many leading Jewish figures such as Benjamin Disraeli, Ferdinand de Rothschild and Philip Sassoon in the UK, Leopoldo Franchetti in Italy, Walter Rathenau in Germany, and Théodor Reinach in France. Conversely, the literature on country houses, which typically focuses on the landed aristocracy, has paid little or no attention to the existence of country houses and rural estates in Jewish hands, or to the particular challenges this posed in a rural landscape and social context so powerfully shaped by Christianity.

Click here to view the call for papers.
 

Contact name: 
Oliver Cox
Contact email: 
Apr
15
Sun
Advanced Curatorial Education Programme @ Frankfurt Jewish Museum
Apr 15 @ 10:00 – Apr 19 @ 16:00


The next edition of the Advanced Curatorial Education Programme will take place in Frankfurt (DE) in April 2018. The programme will have a special focus on Judaica collections that were created in the second half of the 19th century and up until the 1930s as the result of a growing interest in arts and crafts on the one hand, and on the other hand because of the founding of Jewish museums or departments in municipal museums a new collection area (Judaica) came into being.

NOTE:

The A-CEP Frankfurt 2018 is open for staff members from Association of European Jewish Museum member institutions who work with historical Judaica collections.

Registration is required. Find details here: http://www.aejm.org/curatorial/a-cep/