Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Mar
1
Fri
Hideouts. The Architecture of Survival @ Jewish Museum Frankfufrt
Mar 1 – Sep 1 all-day
Hideouts. The Architecture of Survival @ Jewish Museum Frankfufrt | Frankfurt am Main | Hessen | Germany

A multimedia exhibition by the artist, architect and historian Natalia Romik dedicated to the creativity of Polish Jews seeking to survive the Shoah in hiding.

In Poland and Ukraine during World War II, approximately 50,000 people survived persecution by the German occupying forces in hiding. The majority of them were Jewish. They found refuge in tree hollows, closets, basements, sewers, empty graves, and other precarious locations. Natalia Romik’s exhibition “Hideouts. The Architecture of Survival” pays tribute to these fragile places of refuge and explores their physicality. The show poses basic questions about the relationship between architecture, private life, and the public sphere: it addresses the protective function of spaces and emphasizes the creativity those in hiding brought to bear in their attempt to survive.

In a research project extending over several years, Natalia Romik and an interdisciplinary team of researchers consulted oral histories to identify several hiding places, which they explored using forensic methods. The multimedia exhibition “Hideouts. The Architecture of Survival” presents the results of this research. It consists of sculptures bearing a direct connection to the sites and includes documentary films, forensic recordings, photos, documents, and objects found in the hiding places.

“Hideouts: The Architecture of Survival” is presented in cooperation with the Zachęta National Gallery of Art in Warsaw and the TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art in Szczecin. On the occasion of the show at the Jewish Museum Frankfurt, a catalogue will be published in German and English editions by Hatje Cantz Verlag.

The exhibition was curated by Kuba Szreder and Stanisław Ruksza with the help of Aleksandra Janus (scientific collaboration). For the presentation in Frankfurt, Katja Janitschek, curator of the Judengasse Museum, was responsible for the curatorial project management. We would like to thank the Evonik Foundation for their generous support.

 

Mar
29
Fri
Jews in 20th Century Italy @ National Museum of Italian Judaism and the Shoah
Mar 29 – Oct 6 all-day

The  exhibit showcases Italian Jewish experience in the 20th century, beginning with the destruction of the ghettos at the end of the 19th century, through the Shoah, and up until almost the present day.

It includes contemporary artworks; photographs from public and private archives; historical documents, and family objects. 

Tempio Maggiore, Great Synagogue, Rome,
Tempio Maggiore, Great Synagogue, Rome, built in 1904 after the opening of the Ghetto

 

Apr
2
Tue
Houses of Eternity – Domy wieczności @ Płońsk Memorial House
Apr 2 – Jun 9 all-day
Houses of Eternity - Domy wieczności @ Płońsk Memorial House | Płońsk | Mazowieckie | Poland

An exhibition about Jewish cemeteries, prepared by the Galicia Jewish Museum.

In many places throughout Poland, Jewish cemeteries or what remains of them are the only visible sign of the centuries-long presence of Jewish communities in a given area. The exhibition “Houses of Eternity” is a reflection on what Jewish cemeteries mean to us today and an attempt to find an answer to the question of what we can learn from them. Its aim is to introduce the topic of Jewish cemeteries to the widest possible audience, help understand how important an element of cultural heritage the preserved Jewish cemeteries are and answer a number of questions related to cemeteries in the context of Jewish history and tradition.

The opening is at 1 p.m., April 2

Apr
5
Fri
House of Eternity – Haus del Ewigkeit @ Capa-Haus Leipzig
Apr 5 – May 26 all-day
House of Eternity - Haus del Ewigkeit @ Capa-Haus Leipzig | Leipzig | Sachsen | Germany
The latest exhibit of black and white photographs from  70 Jewish cemeteries in Germany, Poland, Ukraine and the Czech Republic, by by Marcel-Th. and Klaus Jacobs.
 
Short texts explain the local conditions and the backgrounds of the visited cemeteries.
 
An exhibition by the cultural association “Circle of friends for the preservation of Jewish cemeteries in the Central European cultural space, e.V.” in cooperation with CAPA Culture gGmbH.
 
The exhibit opening is April 4, at 7 pm.
 
Hours are:
 
Tuesday-Friday 11am-4pm (except holidays)
as well as Sunday the 21st April and 19th May 2024 11am to 4pm
 
May
17
Fri
(post)JEWISH… Shtetl Opatów Through the Eyes of Mayer Kirshenblatt @ POLIN Museum, Warsaw
May 17 – Dec 16 all-day
(post)JEWISH… Shtetl Opatów Through the Eyes of Mayer Kirshenblatt @ POLIN Museum, Warsaw | Warszawa | Województwo mazowieckie | Poland

There were more than a thousand shtetls in today’s territories of Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania and Belarus.  The Second World War and the Holocaust obliterated the world of shtetls completely. Today, in Opatów—as well as in tens of other Polish towns—there are no more Jews left.

The OPOLIN Museum’s  new temporary exhibition titled (post) JEWISH… demonstrates that Polish towns hide two parallel histories. The history of their Polish inhabitants is well known and remembered. The one of their Jewish neighbours who are no more is forgotten or left unsaid. 

Guide in the exhibition will be the late Mayer Kirshenblatt, a painter who emigrated to Canada with his mother and brothers as a teenager, in 1934. Mayer recalls the shtetl of his youth, restoring vivid memories of the people, events, daily life and customs. His paintings—full of color, imagination and humor—show us a world that is no more. Looking at them, we learn about our shared Polish-Jewish history.

The exhibition also features a documentation of artistic interventions carried out in today’s Opatów, aimed at discovering and restoring the vestiges of the pre-war Jewish life.

Click here to buy tickets

 

May
24
Fri
Week of Discovering European Cemeteries
May 24 – Jun 2 all-day
Week of Discovering European Cemeteries

An annual event aimed at raising awareness of the importance of significant cemeteries. Exhibitions, concerts, guided tours, seminars, workshops and other activities take place. 

It is organised by the Association of Significant Cemeteries  in Europe.  

To date, not many Jewish cemeteries are part of the Association — but there are many significant Jewish cemeteries.

 

May
28
Tue
Moravian Jewish Museum presentation @ Bohemian National Hall, New York
May 28 @ 18:30 – 19:30
Moravian Jewish  Museum presentation @ Bohemian National Hall, New York | New York | New York | United States

A presentation on the initiative to build a new Moravian Jewish Museum in Brno, Czech Republic.

Sep
8
Sun
From Shtetl to Post-Jewish Town @ POLIN Museum, Warsaw
Sep 8 – Sep 10 all-day
From Shtetl to Post-Jewish Town @ POLIN Museum, Warsaw | Warszawa | Województwo mazowieckie | Poland

While the historical shtetl has been studied extensively, the post-Jewish town, as a historical phenomenon and evolving site of contested memory, has received less attention. After the Holocaust, the many towns where Jewish communities had lived for centuries and where they had created a distinctive way of life became places without Jews. We want to explore this process of transforming shtetls into post-Jewish space.

The conference is organized as part of the events accompanying the new temporary exhibition of POLIN Museum “(post)JEWISH… Shtetl Opatów Through the Eyes of Mayer Kirshenblatt” opening on May 17, 2024. The exhibition will juxtapose postwar memories of prewar Jewish life in Polish Opatów, as recorded in words and paintings by a self-taught artist – Mayer Kirshenblatt, with the postwar post-Jewish town.

 

Sep
22
Sun
Future for Religious Heritage Conference 2024
Sep 22 – Sep 24 all-day
Future for Religious Heritage  Conference 2024 @ Kraków | Lesser Poland Voivodeship | Poland

FRH Conference 2024 – Religious Heritage in Transition: Challenges and Solutions

Religious heritage must respond to the changes brought about by the emergence of new digital technologies, the effects of climate change and the way we understand, relate to and value our historic buildings and intangible heritage in 21st-century Europe. Our conference will explore existing initiatives and possible future solutions so that the various actors involved in religious heritage, including heritage professionals, academics, policy makers at all levels, religious bodies and European citizens, do not fall behind in this triple transition (green, digital and social).

The conference will address this overarching topic through four thematic sessions:
-Resilient Heritage
-Sustainable Solutions
-Digital Futures
-Quality of Life

 

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