Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Oct
3
Thu
House of Life exhibition @ Willesden Library, London
Oct 3 2019 – Feb 16 2020 all-day
House of Life exhibition @ Willesden Library, London | England | United Kingdom

A never before seen showcase of the heritage of Willesden Jewish Cemetery, London’s preeminent Victorian Jewish Cemetery, established in 1873.

The House of Life Exhibition previews new displays of the cemetery’s rich history, ahead of its opening to the wider public in 2020.

The exhibition introduces visitors to the  lives of selected individuals buried there, describes the Jewish approach to death and mourning, and gives a glimpse of the the cemetery buildings and landscape. 
The displays further invite us all to reflect on the people we have lost and how we like to remember them. 

The exhibition is presented by the United Synagogue in partnership with Brent Museum and Archives.

Researched by volunteers and designed by Philip Simpson Design, the exhibition is part of the House of Life heritage project of the United Synagogue, which is supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

 

Jan
22
Wed
Songs Unearthed: Music from Willesden Jewish Cemetery @ The Library at Willesden Green
Jan 22 @ 19:00 – 23:45
Songs Unearthed: Music from Willesden Jewish Cemetery @ The Library at Willesden Green | England | United Kingdom

A specially curated programme of music spanning many genres. Numbers familiar from stage and screen will surprise you with their connections to Willesden.  Event for adults.

Admission £8, Concessions (job-seekers, students, over 65): £4

Booking – www.theus.org.uk/exhibition

Apr
21
Tue
History of Synagogue Music in London @ London
Apr 21 @ 18:00 – 19:00
History of Synagogue Music in London @ London | England | United Kingdom

This lecture by Cantor Eliot Alderman will consider some of the main musical developments since then, beginning with the Sephardi and Ashkenazi synagogues which stood practically side-by-side in the City of London for 250 years. He will examine the birth of the Anglo-Jewish choral tradition, the split with the Reform movement and its musical consequences, and the new music brought more recently by immigrants from Eastern Europe and Arab lands.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture 

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