Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

Sep
26
Sun
I-Tal-Ya Jewish books presentation @ Meis museum (and online streaming)
Sep 26 @ 11:30 – 12:30
I-Tal-Ya Jewish books presentation @ Meis museum (and online streaming) | Ferrara | Emilia-Romagna | Italy

I-Tal-Ya is a collaborative effort to identify and catalogue every Hebrew book in Italy. It is being carried out by the Union of Jewish Communities in Italy (UCEI), the Rome National Central Library (BNCR), and the National Library of Israel (NLI) in Jerusalem, with the support of the Rothschild Foundation Hanadiv Europe.

The project includes cataloguing an estimated 35,000 volumes from 14 Jewish communities and 25 state institutions and will take approximately three years to complete. 

The event is held within the program of Ferrara’s annual Jewish Book Festival.

 

Oct
18
Mon
A World Beyond: Jewish Cemeteries in Turkey 1583-1990 @ online
Oct 18 @ 16:00 – 19:30
A World Beyond: Jewish Cemeteries in Turkey 1583-1990 @ online

An international conference to officially launch the massive website and digital database of Jewish cemeteries in Turkey, A World Beyond: Jewish Cemeteries in Turkey 1583-1990.  

The database and web site are a project of the The Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Research Center of Tel Aviv University. We wrote about it when it first went online last year as a beta version — though the site still says it’s in beta, the kinks that some users experienced appear to have been worked out, and we find it easy to search and use. 

Dedicated to the memory of  the oriental studies scholar Bernard Lewis, who died in 2018, the database is the culmination of decades of research by Prof. Minna Rozen (and others) and comprises digital images and detailed textual content of more than 61,000 Jewish gravestones from a variety of communities in Turkey from 1583 until 1990. Rozen’s onsite documentation of the cemeteries was carried out in 1988-1990. The material was digitized in the 1990s but until the web site was uploaded, it had not been publicly accessible.

Oct
19
Tue
Jewish Heritage in Bratislava Region @ BSK office
Oct 19 all-day
Jewish Heritage in Bratislava Region @ BSK office | Bratislavský kraj | Slovakia

Organised by the Bratislava Regional administration, the conference will mark recent developments and future plans regarding Jewish heritage in the Bratislava region, including the restoration of the synagogue in Senec and plans to restore the synagogue in Svaty Jur.

Topics will include:

  • The importance of Slovak monuments in Europe
  • Plans for the abandoned synagogues and cemeteries
  • The story of the synagogue in Senec
  • The monumental value of the synagogue in Svätý Jur
  • Symbolism of tombstones in Jewish cemeteries

Click here to see the full program

 

The  conference is organized by the Bratislava self-governing region on the occasion of 2021 European Cultural Heritage Days, with input from the SNM – Museum of Jewish Culture,  the Academia Istropolitana Nova, the Monuments Office of the Slovak Republic and the Municipal Office for the Protection of Monuments in Bratislava.

 

Nov
9
Tue
Slovakia Jewish Cultural Heritage conference
Nov 9 @ 09:00 – 12:00

The annual conference on Jewish cultural heritage in Slovakia can be followed online at https://www.facebook.com/zidianaslovensku.

The annual Eugen Barkany prize will be awarded.

Apr
23
Sat
Yearning for Baden: Jewish Houses tell (Hi)stories @ Kaiserhaus
Apr 23 – Nov 6 all-day
Yearning for Baden: Jewish Houses tell (Hi)stories @ Kaiserhaus | Baden | Niederösterreich | Austria

Baden bei Wien – Baden by Vienna – was long a popular spa and summer guests were originally attracted by the glamorous presence of the Imperial Court.

Many of these families who spent their summers in Baden had Jewish roots. They built villas in a variety of styles – historicist, art nouveau and modernist – a fascinating mixture and shaped summer life in Baden until 1938.

This exhibition  is dedicated to ten families and their villas.

Click here for an interactive map with the villas

 

Apr
26
Tue
Reopening of the Kobersdorf Synagogue @ Kobersdorf Synagogue
Apr 26 all-day
Reopening of the Kobersdorf Synagogue @ Kobersdorf Synagogue | Kobersdorf | Burgenland | Austria

The Synagogue in Kobersdorf reopens after a three-year restoration process. It will be a cultural and educational centre, with a focus on local Jewish history and heritage.

 

Jun
9
Thu
Synagogues as tangible and intangible cultural heritage @ Kobersdorf synagogue
Jun 9 all-day
Synagogues as tangible and intangible cultural heritage @ Kobersdorf synagogue | Kobersdorf | Burgenland | Austria

A symposium connected with the reopening of the Kobersdorf synagogue after its restoration as a cultural venue

The program will be posted here: http://www.forschungsgesellschaft.at/synagoge/index.html

 

The photo shows the synagogue before restoration

 

Jun
10
Fri
20 Years Chatam Sofer Memorial exhibition @ Jewish Community Museum Bratislava
Jun 10 – Oct 9 all-day

A special exhibit marking the 20th anniversary of the underground complex designed by the architect Martin Kvasnica containing remnants of Bratislava’s Old Jewish Cemetery, which was destroyed in 1944, — 23 graves surrounding the Chatam Sofer’s tomb.

Rabbi Moshe Schreiber, known as the Chatam Sofer (or Chasam Sofer), was a renowned rabbi and scholar who was born in Frankfurt am Main on 26 September 1762 (7 Tishrei 5523).

The Chatam Sofer mausoleum, Bratislava

 

Open

Friday 10:00 – 16:00
Sunday 10:00 – 16:00

Jun
11
Sat
Synagogues as tangible and intangible cultural heritage @ Kobersdorf synagogue
Jun 11 all-day
Synagogues as tangible and intangible cultural heritage @ Kobersdorf synagogue | Kobersdorf | Burgenland | Austria

A symposium connected with the reopening of the Kobersdorf synagogue after its restoration as a cultural venue

The program will be posted here: http://www.forschungsgesellschaft.at/synagoge/index.html

 

The photo shows the synagogue before restoration

 

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