Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Jan
17
Thu
Monument to a Monument @ Saulėtekis school, Vilnius
Jan 17 @ 10:00 – 11:00

Opening of an exhibition of photographs by photographer Rimantas Dichavičius showing the Uzupis Jewish cemetery in Vilnius in 1964, before it was destroyed by the communist regime.

The exhibition marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Feb
5
Tue
Symposium honoring James Young @ UMass Amherst
Feb 5 @ 10:00 – 17:30

The UMass Amherst Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies hosts a daylong symposium honoring the work of James Young, Distinguished Professor emeritus of English and Judaic and Near Eastern studies and founding director of the institute.

The symposium, “Edges, Textures, Stages: James Young and the Field of Memory Studies,” will be followed by a reception until 6:30 p.m. The symposium and reception are free and open to the public.

Young, an important figure in the field of memory studies, taught at UMass Amherst from 1988 until his retirement in 2018. He also has consulted with municipal agencies in developing memorials and was a jury member for the National 9/11 Memorial competition.

He is the author of “Writing and Rewriting the Holocaust,” “The Texture of Memory,” “At Memory’s Edge: After-images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture,” and “The Stages of Memory: Reflections on Memorial Art, Loss, and the Spaces Between.”

The symposium will feature panel talks by visiting scholars, including:

  • Lawrence Douglas, James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought at Amherst College and author of “The Right Wrong Man: John Demjanjuk and the Last Great Nazi War Crimes Trial”
  • Alice M. Greenwald, president and chief executive officer of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum
  • Debórah Dwork, Rose Professor of Holocaust History, founding director of the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University and co-author of “Flight from the Reich: Refugee Jews, 1933-1946” and “Auschwitz”
  • Horst Hoheisel, sculpture artist and designer of “counter-monuments” such as “The Crushed Brandenburg Gate”
  • Laura Levitt, professor of religion, Jewish studies and gender at Temple University and author of “American Jewish Loss after the Holocaust”
  • Samuel Kassow, Charles H. Northam Professor of History at Trinity College and author of “Who will Write our History: Emanuel Ringelblum and the Oyneg Shabes Archive”
Feb
24
Sun
Jewish Islington walking tour
Feb 24 @ 14:00 – 17:00

As of Feb. 3 — only the March 31 date is still available! Feb. 24 is sold out!

Walking tours organized by Chabad and led by Chabad Rabbi Mendy

During the 18th and 19th centuries London’s Islington borough had one of the largest Jewish populations in England. Discover the borough’s Jewish history.

The tour includes important sites of the historic Jewish community, including where the North London Synagogue once stood. You will find out about a wide range of characters, where they came from, where they lived, where they worshipped, and what happened to them. A rich cast of politicians, founders of business empires, inventors, mathematicians, artists, architects, writers, eccentrics, and villains is promised – not forgetting the many people with more ordinary lives who made up the community.

Meeting place in Islington will be provided on booking.

Mar
31
Sun
Jewish Islington walking tour
Mar 31 @ 14:00 – 17:00

As of Feb. 3 — only the March 31 date is still available! Feb. 24 is sold out!

Walking tours organized by Chabad and led by Chabad Rabbi Mendy

During the 18th and 19th centuries London’s Islington borough had one of the largest Jewish populations in England. Discover the borough’s Jewish history.

The tour includes important sites of the historic Jewish community, including where the North London Synagogue once stood. You will find out about a wide range of characters, where they came from, where they lived, where they worshipped, and what happened to them. A rich cast of politicians, founders of business empires, inventors, mathematicians, artists, architects, writers, eccentrics, and villains is promised – not forgetting the many people with more ordinary lives who made up the community.

Meeting place in Islington will be provided on booking.

Apr
1
Mon
Sacred Space & Sanctity in Judaism & Christianity @ Catholic Theological Union Academic and Conference Center
Apr 1 @ 09:00 – Apr 2 @ 16:30

This two-day conference, co-sponsored by Catholic Theological Union and the University of Notre Dame, will focus on issues of scholarship and community which are at the heart of Jewish-Christian dialogue. It includes panels and presentations from 13 scholars at the forefront of Jewish-Christian studies, both here in the United States and internationally.

Presentations include a panel on: Synagogues, Churches, Shrines: Interacting Sacred Spaces in Antiquity

 

Jul
2
Tue
Art and the Holocaust: Reflections for the Common Future @ Jews in Latvia Museum, Riga
Jul 2 – Jul 3 all-day
Riga Jewish Community, Museum “Jews in Latvia” and Museum of Romans Suta and Aleksandra Belcova (Riga, Latvia), in collaboration with the International Center of Litvak Photography (Kaunas, Lithuania) and Jewish Historical Institute (Warsaw, Poland) are sponsoring the International Conference “Art and the Holocaust: Reflections for the Common Future”. 
 
The aim of the conference is to present new researches about the relationships between the Holocaust and art (drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, contemporary art, the art of commemoration), as well as the ways that individuals reacted towards atrocities, how they tried to preserve their human dignity, and how the traumatic experience of the Holocaust has influenced European society. 
Sep
19
Thu
Romaniote Memories – a Jewish Journey from Ioannina, Greece to Manhattan @ Greek Consulate in New York
Sep 19 @ 18:00 – Oct 3 @ 19:00
Romaniote Memories - a Jewish Journey from Ioannina, Greece to Manhattan @ Greek Consulate in New York | New York | New York | United States

Exhibition of Photographs by Vincent Giordano.

The photographs are part of a multi-media archive, created by Giordano, who died in 2010, that was sponsored by International Survey of Jewish Monuments and in 2019 will find a new home at the Hellenic American Project and Special Collections at the Library of Queens College, New York.

Giordano’s photographs document two related communities of Greek Romaniote Jews – in Ioannina, in northwestern Greece and on Broome Street on New York’s Lower East Side. Romaniote Jews trace their religious and cultural heritage to the Judaism of the ancient Greco-Roman world two-thousand years ago, and these two tiny congregations are among the few remaining to follow these traditions. Romaniotes have their own liturgy and cultural traditions, as well as their own language, a dialect of Greek that combines words and phrases from Hebrew and Turkish. This luminous black and white photo essay includes a poignant exploration of liturgy and ritual, conveying how people engage with religious space and carry on their time-honored sacred traditions.

The exhibition will open on Thursday, September 19th , 2019 at 6:00 p.m. it will continue through October 3rd, 2019. 

A panel discussion by experts will take place at the Consulate on Wednesday, September 25th, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

 

Oct
25
Fri
Southern Jewish Historical Society conference @ Charlottesville, Virginia
Oct 25 – Oct 27 all-day
Southern Jewish Historical Society conference @ Charlottesville, Virginia | Charlottesville | Virginia | United States
“Jews, Race, and Public Memory”
44th Annual Conference of the Southern Jewish Historical Society
Charlottesville, Virginia
October 25-27, 2019
 
JHE Director Ruth Ellen Gruber is speaking on Oct. 26
 
 
Feb
11
Thu
Virtual Opening of Romaniote Memories: Photos of Vincent Giordano @ Online Zoom event
Feb 11 @ 17:00 – 18:00
Virtual Opening of Romaniote Memories: Photos of Vincent Giordano @ Online Zoom event
The exhibition can be seen at this link: https://scalar.usc.edu/works/romaniote-memories/index
 
In 1999, photographer Vincent Giordano made an unplanned visit to the small Kehila Kedosha Janina (KKJ) synagogue on New York’s Lower East Side. He knew little about Judaism or synagogues, and even less about the Romaniote Jewish tradition of which KKJ, built in 1927, is the lone North American representative. In this he was not alone. Romaniotes are among the least known of Jewish communities. Beginning in 2001 and guided by members of the KKJ community, Giordano documented the synagogue and its religious art of the congregation using film, video, and audio.
 
In 2019 the Giordano family donated the archive of Vincent’s work to Queens College, where it is a major part of the Hellenic American Project and is preserved as part of the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library’s Special Collections and Archives.
 
The exhibition is sponsored by the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library, Hellenic American Project, and Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College, in partnership with the International Center for Jewish Monuments, an independent non-profit organization.
 
The exhibition includes more than one hundred photographs, presented in ten thematic sections, accessible here.
 
To register for the exhibition’s opening reception on Zoom, featuring a conversation with curators, distinguished guests, and friends go to:

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