Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Feb
21
Thu
Esrat Nashim – women in the synagogue a matter of sanctity? @ Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg
Feb 21 – Feb 22 all-day

A workshop on Medieval Jewish history and traditions, focusing this year on the separation of women in the synagogue and the reasons for setting up separate sections for women.

It is organized by the Medieval Working Group in the Network  of Jewish Heritage and the City of Erfurt, in cooperation with the College of Jewish Studies, Heidelberg.

Seating is limited, and registration is requested by January 20.

 

On Feb. 21 there will be visits to:

The Old Synagogue in Worms and the Judenhof in Speyer

For further information contact: maria.stuerzebecher@erfurt.de

 

Oct
12
Mon
Architecture, identity, memory – Synagogues in Germany since 1945 @ Town Hall, Emmendingen, Germany
Oct 12 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A lecture by architectural historian Dr. Ulrich Knufinke.

The lecture is part of jubilee events marking the 25th anniversary of the reestablishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen. Seating is limited due to coronavirus measures.

 The lecture examines the history of synagogue architecture in Germany and focuses in particular on those buildings that were built after the Holocaust. Their often remarkable, even challenging design raises the question of what role synagogues play today in the image of our cities.

Ulrich Knufinke is an architectural historian and monument conservator. For many years he was a research assistant at the Bet Tfila – Research Center for Jewish Architecture in Europe at the Technical University of Braunschweig. He currently holds the professorship for architectural history at the TU Braunschweig and works at the Lower Saxony State Office for Monument Preservation.

Click here for details about the jubilee events

Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Oct 12 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Oct
21
Wed
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Oct 21 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Nov
15
Sun
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Nov 15 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Dec
7
Mon
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Dec 7 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

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