Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Oct
18
Sun
Synagogue tour @ Koln syagogue
Oct 18 @ 15:00 – 16:30

Guided tour of the synagogue on Roonstrasse, Cologne, the only surviving synagogue of the five that once stood in the city.

 

Tickets must be booked here — https://www.koelnticket.de/exklusive+f%c3%bchrung+j%c3%bcdische+synagoge+nur+buchbar+%c3%bcber+die+hotline+02212801+neues+datum-ticket-67/?evid=2334775&referer_info=hl&tId=&pageId=67

Oct
21
Wed
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Oct 21 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Nov
15
Sun
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Nov 15 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Dec
7
Mon
Emmendingen Jubilee program @ Emmendingen, Germany
Dec 7 @ 19:00 – 20:00

A series of lectures, mostly dealing with synagogue architecture, is being held to mark the 25th anniversary of the re-establishment of the Jewish community in Emmendingen, Germany.

Except for the first lecture (October 12) they are being held at the Simon-Veit-Haus, Kirchstraße 11.

See program below:

 

Apr
19
Mon
Swedish Synagogue Architecture @ Online Zoom event
Apr 19 all-day
Swedish Synagogue Architecture @ Online Zoom event

The Symposium on Swedish Synagogue Architecture (1795–1870) and the Cultural Milieu of the Early Jewish Immigrants to Sweden will take place on Zoom, on April 19, 2021.

It is organized by the Centre for Theology and Religious Studies at Lund University, the University of Potsdam, and the Institute of Jewish Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, with the support of the Stockholm Jewish Museum.

To attend, click this link to register: http://bit.ly/2021-04-19

The opening presentation will be of particular interest, an overview by Daniel Leviathan of his PhD dissertation project, “Jewish Sacred Architecture in the Nordic Countries 1684-1939.” 

Besides Leviathan, speakers will include Vladimir Levin and Sergey Kravtsov, of the Center for Jewish Art in Jerusalem; Ilia Rodov of Bar Ilan University; Maja Hultman, of the Centre for European Research and Department of Historical Studies at University of Gothenburg Centre for Business History in Stockholm; Mirko Przystawik, of Bet Tfila – Research Unit for Jewish Architecture in Europe, Technische Universität Braunschweig; Yael Fried, of The Jewish Museum of Stockholm; and Carl Henrik Carlsson, of The Hugo Valentin Centre, Department of History, Uppsala University.

Click here to see the full program, with abstracts of talks 

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

May
23
Sun
Jewish cemetery cleanup in Tallya, Hungary @ Jewish cemetery Tallya
May 23 – May 24 all-day
Jewish cemetery cleanup in Tallya, Hungary @ Jewish cemetery Tallya | Tállya | Hungary

Budapest-based researcher and activist Bence Illyés and his “Magyarországi Haszid Zarándoklatokért” Foundation are organizing a two-day clean-up action at the Jewish cemetery in Tállya, eastern Hungary.

The action will be carried-out under the religious supervision of Mazsihisz, the umbrella organization of the Hungarian Neolog Jewish communities.

All those interested in participating can write to: csodakvandorai@gmail.com

Click here to see more about the project (and donate)

Nov
28
Sun
Budapest cemetery clean-up @ Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery
Nov 28 @ 09:00 – 13:00
Budapest cemetery clean-up @ Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery | Budapest | Hungary

Join a volunteer clean up at Budapest’s monumental Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery, organized as a “Mitzvah Day” project by the Hungarian Maccabi sports organization.

May
12
Thu
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University
May 12 all-day
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University | Rostock | Mecklenburg-Vorpommern | Germany

This workshop explores spatial aspects of the experiences of German-Jews during 1930s, in Germany and in transit. In highlighting the convoluted relations between place and identity—and the essential influence of these relations on the history of emotions, thoughts and culture—the workshop focuses on the spaces that shaped German-Jewish self-perceptions in the face of National Socialism. While the workshop discusses specific locations, it also examines the concepts of space and place as analytical tools to enhance the historical understanding of Jewish life under Nazi rule and Jewish responses to Nazi persecution. In so doing, the workshop seeks to scrutinize and complicate recent trends in the study of German-Jewish history.

The Keynote Lecture will be given by Professor Marion Kaplan, a renowned researcher of German-Jewish history in modern times and one of the first to address questions of place and space in the experience of German Jews under Nazism.

Organisers: David Jünger (Universität Rostock), Ofer Ashkenazi (The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History), Björn Siegel (Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden) und Katrin Steffen (Sussex Weidenfeld Institut of Jewish Studies)

This workshop takes place IN PERSON. To comply with current regulations to contain the Covid-19 pandemic, please register in advance by contacting Dr. David Jünger (david.juenger@uni-rostock.de).

 

PROGRAM

Thursday, 12 May

12:30–13:00
Introduction

13:00–15:00
1. Creating Spaces of Memory

Gerald Lamprecht (Graz)
Entangled Memories. Jewish and non-Jewish Discourses on the Great War in Interwar Austria

Katrin Steffen (Brighton)
East German-Jewish Spaces in Berlin. Jewish Heritage Societies (Heimatvereine) and their diasporic milieu in the 1930ies

Joachim Schlör (Southampton)
Brückenallee 33, Berlin

15:30-17:30
2. Being In-Between

David Jünger (Rostock)
From Myth to Reality. German Jews Discover Palestine (1933–1938)

Charlie Knight (Southampton)
Mapping your coordinates. Space and Transnationality in Refugee Correspondence

Björn Siegel (Hamburg/Graz)
Ships to Nowhere. A Maritime Space and Its Relevance to Decode Jewish Refugees’ experiences in the 1930s

18:00-19:30
Keynote Lecture

Marion Kaplan (New York)
The Emotional Dissonance of Spaces. German Jewish Refugees in Portugal

Hörsaal 218, Universitätshauptgebäude, Universitätsplatz 1

 

 

Friday 13 May

09:00-11:30
3. Vanishing Jewish Spaces

Guy Miron (Jerusalem)
Synagogues, Cemeteries, Sports facilities. Jewish spaces and places in Nazi Germany

Teresa Walch (Greensboro)
Rendering Germany ‘judenrein’: Space, Ideology, and German Jews in the 1930s

Kim Wünschmann (Hamburg)
Filming the destruction of the Munich Main Synagogue in June 1938. A spatial history-approach to the reading of visual sources

Miriam Rürup (Potsdam)
Dejudaization before Deportation. The removal of Jewish traces in urban topographies of German cities

12:00-14:00
4. Visualizing Jewish Spaces

Robert Mueller-Stahl (Potsdam)
Capturing crisis. German-Jewish private travel photography between the Weimar Republic and Nazism

Sarah Wobick-Segev (Hamburg)
Being and Not Being in Time and Place

Ofer Aschkenazi (Tel Aviv)
The Displacement of the Ordinary. The German-Jewish Home in Photography Narratives of Emigration

14:15-15:30
Round table: Final Discussion
with Sandwich lunch

 

May
14
Sat
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University
May 14 all-day
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University | Rostock | Mecklenburg-Vorpommern | Germany

This workshop explores spatial aspects of the experiences of German-Jews during 1930s, in Germany and in transit. In highlighting the convoluted relations between place and identity—and the essential influence of these relations on the history of emotions, thoughts and culture—the workshop focuses on the spaces that shaped German-Jewish self-perceptions in the face of National Socialism. While the workshop discusses specific locations, it also examines the concepts of space and place as analytical tools to enhance the historical understanding of Jewish life under Nazi rule and Jewish responses to Nazi persecution. In so doing, the workshop seeks to scrutinize and complicate recent trends in the study of German-Jewish history.

The Keynote Lecture will be given by Professor Marion Kaplan, a renowned researcher of German-Jewish history in modern times and one of the first to address questions of place and space in the experience of German Jews under Nazism.

Organisers: David Jünger (Universität Rostock), Ofer Ashkenazi (The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History), Björn Siegel (Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden) und Katrin Steffen (Sussex Weidenfeld Institut of Jewish Studies)

This workshop takes place IN PERSON. To comply with current regulations to contain the Covid-19 pandemic, please register in advance by contacting Dr. David Jünger (david.juenger@uni-rostock.de).

 

PROGRAM

Thursday, 12 May

12:30–13:00
Introduction

13:00–15:00
1. Creating Spaces of Memory

Gerald Lamprecht (Graz)
Entangled Memories. Jewish and non-Jewish Discourses on the Great War in Interwar Austria

Katrin Steffen (Brighton)
East German-Jewish Spaces in Berlin. Jewish Heritage Societies (Heimatvereine) and their diasporic milieu in the 1930ies

Joachim Schlör (Southampton)
Brückenallee 33, Berlin

15:30-17:30
2. Being In-Between

David Jünger (Rostock)
From Myth to Reality. German Jews Discover Palestine (1933–1938)

Charlie Knight (Southampton)
Mapping your coordinates. Space and Transnationality in Refugee Correspondence

Björn Siegel (Hamburg/Graz)
Ships to Nowhere. A Maritime Space and Its Relevance to Decode Jewish Refugees’ experiences in the 1930s

18:00-19:30
Keynote Lecture

Marion Kaplan (New York)
The Emotional Dissonance of Spaces. German Jewish Refugees in Portugal

Hörsaal 218, Universitätshauptgebäude, Universitätsplatz 1

 

 

Friday 13 May

09:00-11:30
3. Vanishing Jewish Spaces

Guy Miron (Jerusalem)
Synagogues, Cemeteries, Sports facilities. Jewish spaces and places in Nazi Germany

Teresa Walch (Greensboro)
Rendering Germany ‘judenrein’: Space, Ideology, and German Jews in the 1930s

Kim Wünschmann (Hamburg)
Filming the destruction of the Munich Main Synagogue in June 1938. A spatial history-approach to the reading of visual sources

Miriam Rürup (Potsdam)
Dejudaization before Deportation. The removal of Jewish traces in urban topographies of German cities

12:00-14:00
4. Visualizing Jewish Spaces

Robert Mueller-Stahl (Potsdam)
Capturing crisis. German-Jewish private travel photography between the Weimar Republic and Nazism

Sarah Wobick-Segev (Hamburg)
Being and Not Being in Time and Place

Ofer Aschkenazi (Tel Aviv)
The Displacement of the Ordinary. The German-Jewish Home in Photography Narratives of Emigration

14:15-15:30
Round table: Final Discussion
with Sandwich lunch

 

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