Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Oct
4
Fri
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 4 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Oct
5
Sat
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 5 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Oct
6
Sun
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 6 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Oct
7
Mon
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 7 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Oct
8
Tue
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 8 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Oct
9
Wed
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery
Oct 9 @ 11:00 – 19:00
In Fading Light: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe @ Tryptych Gallery | Kyiv | Ukraine

Kyiv fine art gallery Triptych: Global Arts Workshop with the support of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kyiv presents ‘IN FADING LIGHT: Jewish Traces in the East of Europe’.

Photographs by Christian Herrmann

🔸The exhibition will be on display 26th September to 9th October 2019, Mon-Sat 11.00-19.00.
🔸Sunday closed.
🔸Entrance is free.
🔸Private view: Thursday 26th September at 19.00.
🔸Artist Talk: Saturday 29th September at 17.30.

This exhibition is part of a wider programme of events commemorating the Babyn Yar massacre (29-30th September 1941). It presents for the first time 14 photographs of Jewish heritage sites taken during the photographer’s travels in Ukraine and Belarus in 2018 and 2019: synagogues, batei midrash, private houses, and cemeteries, some ruined or abandoned, others repurposed.

Jan
26
Sun
Holocaust and Memory. @ Jewish Museum London
Jan 26 @ 14:45 – 17:00
Holocaust and Memory. @ Jewish Museum London | England | United Kingdom

Dr Sofiya Dyak, Nikita Kadan and Professor Philippe Sands  discuss the evolution of the practices of Holocaust remembrance and its public discourse in Ukraine: How are these tragic events remembered across different communities and why? How to deal with histories of lands subjected to multiple occupations and mass murder across communities? How to write a historic narrative for the country, which is still in a state of war?

This event is part of Holocaust Memorial Day.

Dr Sofiya Dyak is the Director of the Lviv Centre of Urban History, a private institution which initiated a number of important initiatives commemorating Jewish community presence in Lviv in partnership with Lviv’s municipality, including the Space of Synagogues memorial. In 2017, the centre hosted the “Un-named” project, reflecting on mass violence in Ukraine between 1931 and 1945. The project included visual work by Nikita Kadan, Ukraine’s contemporary artist. Similarly, Professor Philippe Sands traced his family history back to Lviv, with the city becoming the focus of much of his literary work and intellectual reflection.

Mar
1
Sun
Devastated, Decayed, Revived – Former Synagogues in Poland and Ukraine @ Städtischen Galerie Haus Seel, Siegen
Mar 1 @ 16:00 – Mar 22 @ 18:00

And exhibition of photographs by Eva Maria Kraiss.

The exhibition is presented as part of the Week of Brotherhood 2020.

The opening is March 1 at 4 p.m. It will be open daily except Monday, from 2 – 6 p.m., and on Sundays also from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

See more details in the poster below:

 

Sep
23
Wed
Exhibition opening @ Lviv Museum of History of Religion
Sep 23 @ 16:00 – 17:00
Exhibition opening @ Lviv Museum of History of Religion | L'viv | L'vivs'ka oblast | Ukraine
The exhibition will feature 22 ritual items used in synagogues or by Jewish families as well as photos from the collection of Vladimir Rumyantsev and Yaroslav Yanchak, provided by the Center for Urban History of Central and Eastern Europe from its media archive.
 
Among the exhibits are Galician Hanukkah menorahs, a Torah crown, tzedaka boxes, and a post-war velvet parochot with an embroidered inscription dedicated to the victims of the Holocaust
 
Some of the items were kept during 1945–1962 in the Jakub Glanzer Synagogue. They were later confiscated by the Soviet authorities and transferred to the Lviv Historical Museum, and from there to the Lviv Museum of the History of Religion and Atheism (Today – the Lviv Museum of the History of Religion). 
The curator of the exhibition is Maxim Martin, the head of the museum’s Judaism department.
.
The exhibition will be up until the end of the year.
Feb
23
Tue
Legacy of the Shtetl: Investigating Polish-Belarusian-Ukrainian Borderlands @ Online Zoom event
Feb 23 @ 18:00 – 19:00
Legacy of the Shtetl: Investigating Polish-Belarusian-Ukrainian Borderlands @ Online Zoom event | Bentonville | Arkansas | United States
The Legacy of the Shtetl: Investigating Polish-Belarusian-Ukrainian Borderlands
with Dr Magdalena Waligórska, and Dr Natalia Romik, respondent, and with Prof François Guesnet, Chair 
 
Co-organized by the Institute for Polish-Jewish Studies and  the UCL Institute of Jewish Studies
 
Magdalena Waligórska takes us on a journey to the post-1945 Polish-Ukrainian-Belorusian borderlands where she explores small towns which had a predominantly Jewish population before the Second World War and the Holocaust. Here, Jewish property both entirely fell under the control of the new ethnic majority and remained a “disinherited heritage” that continues to cause dissonance and psychological discomfort to its current “heirs.”
 
The unsettling presence of Jewish ruins, resurfacing human remains, walled-in objects, collapsing cellars, and the recycled tombstones constitutes an “intrusion of the past into the present” that, decades after the war, still demands action and results in different local responses.
 
The respondent, Natalia Romik, is an artist, urban historian, and architect from Warsaw who has undertaken similar but different explorations of the Jewish heritage in small Polish towns.
 

Comments are closed.