Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Sep
13
Fri
English Heritage Open Days @ More than 15 synagogues, 4 Jewish cemeteries
Sep 13 – Sep 22 all-day
English Heritage Open Days @ More than 15 synagogues, 4 Jewish cemeteries

 

More than 15 historic synagogues all over England can be visited at various times during England’s 15th annual Heritage Open Days.

They include synagogues in Reading, Bristol, Exeter, Hull, Cheltenham, Bournemouth, Brighton, Manchester — and more. There will also be tours of four Jewish cemeteries in Brighton, London, Liberpool, and King’s Lynn.

Click here to see the synagogue list

Click here to see the cemetery list

 

 

Sep
15
Sun
Heritage Open Days: Montefiore Synagogue @ Montefiore Synagogue
Sep 15 @ 10:00 – 15:00

A chance to see inside the synagogue built by Sir Moses Montefiore in 1833. The nearby Mausoleum contains the tombs of Sir Moses and Lady Judith Montefiore. The Synagogue was designed by David Mocatta and was the first synagogue to be built in England by a Jewish architect.

Access is limited due to the historic nature of the buildings.
Access to buildings via woodland path.

 

Sep
22
Sun
Glasgow open days – visit synagogue @ Garnethill synagogue
Sep 22 @ 10:00 – 16:00
Glasgow open days - visit synagogue @ Garnethill synagogue | Scotland | United Kingdom

Visit the Garnethill synagogue as part of the Glasgow Doors Open Days Festival, an annual event celebrating the city’s architecture, culture & heritage through a free programme of open buildings and events taking place over one week in September.

It is Scotland’s first purpose-built Synagogue. As well as continuing to be an active place of worship, the building is the home of the Scottish Jewish Archive Centre and Museum.

Oct
18
Sun
Hidden Treasures from the UK’s Synagogues @ webinar
Oct 18 @ 18:00 – 19:00

A live online event to discuss and display photo collections and other “hidden treasures” from the archives of synagogues in the UK.

  • Professor David Newman – Ben Gurion University
  • Rachel Lichtenstein – Sandys Row synagogue and Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Lizzy Baker – Tyne and Wear Archives

The event can be watched live on Hidden Treasures web site or on HT’s Facebook and Twitter pages. The discussion will be recorded and will be available to watch on the HT web site after the event.

The feature picture shows the opening of Hull Central Synagogue, Cogan Street • Hull History Centre.

Mar
15
Mon
Connecting Small Histories: a Festival of Local Heritage @ Online Zoom event
Mar 15 – Mar 25 all-day
Connecting Small Histories: a Festival of Local Heritage @ Online Zoom event

The Festival brings together both the work of the National Lottery Heritage project “Connecting Small Histories” and 12 other major Jewish Heritage projects.

“Connecting Small Histories” draws the footprint of Jewish life in what are now small or former communities across the United Kingdom. Through stories and memories it identifies the Jewish legacy in the local economies and culture, beginning with six very different locations, Eastbourne, St Annes, Bradford, Sunderland, Cumbria and Somerset.

After almost twelve months of work, the History Festival begins the telling of these “Small Histories”, bringing both them and a wide selection of projects from the project’s Heritage Hub to a wider public.

The program brings together story tellers, academics, our volunteer researchers and the research team, to paint a picture of Jewish life and heritage spread wide across the country, in towns and countryside.

Jewish Heritage Europe is delighted to be one of the partners of this event!

Click here to see the program and register for the online events

 

 

Mar
17
Wed
Architecture and Assimilation: Anglo-Jews, Alien Jews and the Politics of the Fin de Siècle Synagogue @ webinar
Mar 17 @ 16:00 – 17:30

A seminar that will be held online on Microsoft Teams. Guests can register, and gain access, by emailing TRS@chester.ac.uk

Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Chester.

 

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

Aug
3
Tue
World War I Jewish Soldiers – Willesden Jewish Cemetery @ online webinar
Aug 3 @ 20:00 – 21:00
World War I Jewish Soldiers - Willesden Jewish Cemetery @ online webinar

Willesden Jewish Cemetery volunteer researchers Corinne Van Colle and Jackie Asher spent 2½ years uncovering the stories of the many Jewish soldiers killed in action during World War 1 who are buried or commemorated in the cemetery. Encountering many challenges including worn headstones, inconsistent records, and changed names, they eventually discovered commemorations relating to over 350 servicemen (and one woman!). Research revealed, too, their many different family backgrounds: these were the sons of Edwardian Anglo-Jewish engineers, bootmakers and bankers. In this webinar, Corinne and Jackie will share some of the forgotten stories of the young Jewish men, memorialised in the cemetery in moving inscriptions and poems, who went to war in 1914.

Oct
3
Sun
1821-2021: 200 Years of the Haguenau Synagogue @ IUT de Haguenau
Oct 3 all-day
1821-2021: 200 Years of the Haguenau Synagogue @ IUT de Haguenau | Haguenau | Grand Est | France

A day-long conference to mark the 200th anniversary of the synagogue of Haguenau, in France’s Alsace region.

Click here to see the program

 

 

Comments are closed.