Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Jun
21
Sun
Tour Jewish Cemetery Zizkov Prague @ Old Jewish Cemetery Zizkov
Jun 21 @ 14:00 – 15:00
Tour Jewish Cemetery Zizkov Prague @ Old Jewish Cemetery Zizkov | Hlavní město Praha | Czechia

A guided tour of the 17th century Jewish cemetery, which was largely destroyed in early 1960s and then in the 1980s when the Czech TV tower was built there. A large part of the cemetery was dug up, tombstones were knocked down and broken and the rest of the cemetery was filled in a turned into a park.

Though only a small part of the cemetery still exists, it covers a broad range of styles, from Baroque, Empire and Romantic to the common forms of the latter half of the 19th century.  In 1999, the Jewish Museum in Prague took over the administration of the preserved part, which is a protected historical monument. Following essential structural repairs and basic restoration work, the cemetery was opened to the public in September 2001. The restoration of the tombstones continued and 164 tombstones and 4 tombs had been restored by the end of 2013.

 

 

Jun
23
Tue
Jewish cemeteries tours @ Eisenstadt, Austria
Jun 23 @ 18:00 – 20:00
Jewish cemeteries tours @ Eisenstadt, Austria | Eisenstadt | Burgenland | Austria

There are two Jewish cemeteries and two tours — the Old Jewish Cemetery at 6 p.m. and the New Jewish Cemetery at 7 p.m. You can register for one or both.

In the old Jewish cemetery the oldest gravestone goes back to the year 1679. The cemetery was used until the summer of 1875. The new Jewish cemetery was established in fall of 1875 as the “successor cemetery” to the older one and was used until 1938. In just a few unusual cases, there were burials after 1945.

Registration is mandatory up to 2 days before the event, limited number of participants (by phone: +43 (0) 2682 65145 or by E-mail: info@ojm.at).

Sep
10
Thu
Translocation Jewish settlement maps exhibit @ National Archive Prague
Sep 10 @ 09:00 – Oct 18 @ 17:00
Translocation Jewish settlement maps exhibit @ National Archive Prague | Hlavní město Praha | Czechia

An exhibition of maps of Jewish settlement in Bohemia and Moravia in the18th century.

Translocation Plans of Jewish residences in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown from 1727–1728 represent a set of extraordinary value, providing a reliable picture of the internal development of settlements and their topography, and documenting, among other things, the economic and social condition of the Jewish population in the Czech lands. On the basis of comparison with other sources and, above all, sketch maps from the Stable Cadastre, it was possible to trace the development of Jewish settlement in the range of more than one century to some extent (until the mid-19th century).

There is also a web site associated with the exhibition

Guided exhibit tour @ Gallery Spalicek, Prostějov
Sep 10 @ 16:00 – 17:30
Guided exhibit tour @ Gallery Spalicek, Prostějov | Prostějov | Olomoucký kraj | Czechia

 

As part of the European Heritage Days, there will be a guided tour of the  exhibit Baroque Synagogues in the Czech Lands. The exhibition is complemented by panels mapping the history of Prostějov synagogues and Jewish prayer houses and the Prostějov Jewish community in general. During the guided tour, you will learn more about some of the exhibited objects. For example, part of the rosette stained glass window, which was saved from the destroyed Olomouc synagogue.

The exhibition is organized in cooperation with the Museum and Gallery in Prostějov, the Jewish Museum in Prague, the Statutory City of Prostějov, the Respect and Tolerance Association, the Comenius Museum in Přerov and the Hanácký Jeruzalém Association. The guided tour will be the curator of the exhibition Filip Gregor from the Prostějov Museum.

Oct
6
Tue
Synagogue guided tour @ Wertheimer synagogue, Eisenstadt, Austria
Oct 6 @ 15:00 – 15:45
Synagogue guided tour @ Wertheimer synagogue, Eisenstadt, Austria | Eisenstadt | Burgenland | Austria

Guided tour of the Wertheimer synagogue, accessible as part of the Austrian Jewish Museum. Dedicated to Jewish life in the province of Burgenland, the museum opened in 1982 in the former mansion of Samson Wertheimer (1659-1724). The private synagogue is part of the mansion.

Wertheimer had a prominent role at the Viennese court, where from 1694 to 1709 he worked for emperors Leopold I, Joseph I, and Charles VI as Hofoberfaktor or chief administrator of financial affairs. He also served the Esterhazy family in Burgenland and was Rabbi of Hungary and Moravia.

A mob destroyed Eisenstadt’s main synagogue on Kristallnacht in 1938 but the they overlooked the  Wertheimer Shul,  hidden in the mansion. The synagogue was re-consecrated for Jewish worship in 1979.

In its current form the synagogue dates almost entirely from 1832, having been refurbished after the Eisenstadt ghetto was badly damaged in a fire of 1795. Its design includes many elements typical of the period, including a high ceiling and a chandelier hanging from a painted rosette. At the inauguration of the building in 1834, members of the community contributed ceremonial silver, a painted glass beaker for the Hevrah Kadisha (Burial Society), Torah scrolls, an elaborate Parohet (Ark curtain) and a parchment Megillah (Scroll of the Book of Esther) executed by the scribe Elie Gabriel, all of which are among the items displayed in the museum today.

 

Oct
7
Wed
Jewish cemetery guided tour @ Jewish cemeteries, Eisenstadt, Austria
Oct 7 @ 20:00 – 21:15
Jewish cemetery guided tour @ Jewish cemeteries, Eisenstadt, Austria | Eisenstadt | Burgenland | Austria

A nighttime tour of the Old and New Jewish cemeteries, in Eisenstadt. Bring a flashlight!

Of the older cemetery, in used from 1679 to 1874, can be considered one of the most important Jewish cemeteries in Europe. The newer cemetery, used until 1938, tells stories about the last decades of Jewish life in Eisenstadt.

 

 

Oct
8
Thu
Synagogue guided tour @ Wertheimer synagogue, Eisenstadt, Austria
Oct 8 @ 15:00 – 15:45
Synagogue guided tour @ Wertheimer synagogue, Eisenstadt, Austria | Eisenstadt | Burgenland | Austria

Guided tour of the Wertheimer synagogue, accessible as part of the Austrian Jewish Museum. Dedicated to Jewish life in the province of Burgenland, the museum opened in 1982 in the former mansion of Samson Wertheimer (1659-1724). The private synagogue is part of the mansion.

Wertheimer had a prominent role at the Viennese court, where from 1694 to 1709 he worked for emperors Leopold I, Joseph I, and Charles VI as Hofoberfaktor or chief administrator of financial affairs. He also served the Esterhazy family in Burgenland and was Rabbi of Hungary and Moravia.

A mob destroyed Eisenstadt’s main synagogue on Kristallnacht in 1938 but the they overlooked the  Wertheimer Shul,  hidden in the mansion. The synagogue was re-consecrated for Jewish worship in 1979.

In its current form the synagogue dates almost entirely from 1832, having been refurbished after the Eisenstadt ghetto was badly damaged in a fire of 1795. Its design includes many elements typical of the period, including a high ceiling and a chandelier hanging from a painted rosette. At the inauguration of the building in 1834, members of the community contributed ceremonial silver, a painted glass beaker for the Hevrah Kadisha (Burial Society), Torah scrolls, an elaborate Parohet (Ark curtain) and a parchment Megillah (Scroll of the Book of Esther) executed by the scribe Elie Gabriel, all of which are among the items displayed in the museum today.

 

Jan
28
Thu
Mapping and Protecting Moldova’s Jewish Cemeteries @ Zoom
Jan 28 @ 15:00 – 16:00
Mapping and Protecting Moldova's Jewish Cemeteries @ Zoom | Bentonville | Arkansas | United States

Online symposium hosted by the European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative ESJF in which experts on the Jewish heritage of Moldova, along with leaders from the Moldovan Jewish community, will discuss the findings from the ESJF survey pilot project and their implications on the future of Moldova’s Jewish cemeteries. 

Working under the framework of the European Commission-funded pilot project, “Protecting the Jewish Cemeteries of Europe”, ESJF European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative mapped and surveyed 1,500 Jewish cemeteries across 5 European countries between 2018 and 2020. Prior to this project, there was no comprehensive list of Jewish cemeteries in the Republic of Moldova. However, with the cooperation of the Jewish Community of Moldova and the Moldovan Ministry of Culture, ESJF has compiled the first full catalogue of Jewish cemeteries in the country.

In doing so, ESJF has not only verified the existence of these sites, but has highlighted their vulnerability, with many found to be demolished or at risk. With these findings, laid out in the ESJF Country Report on Moldova (https://bit.ly/3hMGrZm), we can now explore the best avenues for protecting these valuable sites, whether through physical fencing measures, education programmes, or an emphasis on local authority action.

Register at the link below.
https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_OaL3FnvVR42cMB-pqO2Q-Q

 

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

May
26
Wed
Jewish cemetery Gorizia/Nova Gorica @ Online webinar
May 26 @ 18:00 – 21:00
Jewish cemetery Gorizia/Nova Gorica @ Online webinar

A Zoom seminar about the project to restore the Jewish cemetery of Gorizia, Italy, that now lies across the border outside Nova Gorica, Slovenia. The twin cities will jointly be the European Cultural Capital in 2025, with their shared Jewish heritage playing a role.  In Italian

Click here for details and to register 

Read our 2017 article about the shared Jewish heritage of the towns

Read an Italian perspective about the project

Read a history of the cemetery

Read about the project to restore the cemetery (in English)

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