Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Jun
4
Tue
Jewish catacombs in Venosa, Italy @ Rome, Centro Bibliografico Tullia Zevi
Jun 4 @ 17:00 – 20:00

Presentation of the project documenting and restoring the Jewish catacomb in Venosa, Italy.

Click here to see the program.

 

 

Oct
27
Sun
Cemetery clean-up @ Budapest Kozma utca Jewish cemetery
Oct 27 @ 10:00 – 15:00
Cemetery clean-up @ Budapest Kozma utca Jewish cemetery | Budapest | Hungary

Clean-up and maintenance operation at Budapest’s main Jewish cemetery, with the participation of around 30 students from the city’s Scheiber Jewish school. The students will work in groups of 10 on three different areas of the cemetery,  documenting, cleaning and re-painting the signage of the cemetery’s rows. 

 

Nov
26
Tue
The via Guastalla synagogue in Milan @ via Guastalla synagogue
Nov 26 @ 17:00 – 19:00
The via Guastalla synagogue in Milan @ via Guastalla synagogue | Milano | Lombardia | Italy

A panel discussion about the Milan’s main synagogue, designed by the architect Luca Beltrami and originally built in 1892. It was severely damaged in 1943 but fully rebuilt, conserving the original facade. (In Italian.)

Click here to see program

 

 

Feb
2
Tue
On Ghettoes: Medieval, Modern, and Metaphorical @ Online Zoom discussion
Feb 2 @ 18:00 – 19:00
On Ghettoes: Medieval, Modern, and Metaphorical @ Online Zoom discussion

A discussion sponsored by the American Academy in Rome: (AAR)

The first Conversations/Conversazioni of the calendar year will feature David Nirenberg (2021 Resident), the Deborah R. and Edgar D. Jannotta Distinguished Service Professor of Medieval History and Social Thought at the University of Chicago, where he is also dean of the Divinity School, and AAR Director Avinoam Shalem (2016 Resident).

“Ghetto” emerged as a word to describe a specific late-medieval phenomenon: the creation in Christian cities of segregated and walled neighborhoods in which Jews were required to live. Today its meanings are vaster, and it serves as a metaphor for many different types of containment and segregation. How did these urban spaces emerge? Why did they prove so useful as marginal spaces and a metaphor? And what work do the phenomenon and the metaphor do today?

This conversation, to be presented on Zoom, is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

The start time of this lecture is 6:00pm Central European Time (12:00 noon Eastern Time). It is being recorded and will be edited and posted on the AAR website at a later date.

 

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