Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Sep
6
Sun
Guided tour @ Jewish Cemetery of Haguenau
Sep 6 @ 14:00 – 18:00

The Jewish Cemetery of Haguenau is one of the oldest cemeteries in Alsace and has 3,200 graves, some  dating from the 17th century. 
The cemetery was enlarged in 1766 and 1872. During World War II, its walls and doors were gutted, and graves were also destroyed.

Two guided tours of the cemetery are organized as part of the European Day of Jewish Culture.

Places are limited, registration is required.

Sep
11
Fri
Guided tour @ Small synagogue Erfurt
Sep 11 @ 16:00 – 16:45

Guided tour of the Small Synagogue, which functioned between 1840 and 1884. It now is a Jewish museum.

Here’s the history of the synagogue from the web site https://juedisches-leben.erfurt.de/jl/en/19-century/small_synagogue/index.html

On 10 July 1840 the Jewish community consecrated the Small Synagogue. It was used as a house of worship for only 44 years, until 1884, since the community was growing fast in the 19th century. The community built the Great Synagogue at today’s Juri-Gagarin-Ring and sold the Small Synagogue to a merchant. He used the house as a storage facility and production building. In 1918 the municipality installed apartments. Interest in the Jewish heritage grew in the 1980s. The town had the building history of the synagogue researched and the building restored. Building researchers found the mikveh as well as the Torah shrine and the women’s balcony. So the prayer hall presents itself today in the almost original condition. The Small Synagogue serves today as a meeting centre and shows an exhibition on Jewish life in Erfurt in the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

 

Sep
13
Sun
Guided tour @ Jewish Cemetery of Haguenau
Sep 13 @ 14:00 – 18:00

The Jewish Cemetery of Haguenau is one of the oldest cemeteries in Alsace and has 3,200 graves, some  dating from the 17th century. 
The cemetery was enlarged in 1766 and 1872. During World War II, its walls and doors were gutted, and graves were also destroyed.

Two guided tours of the cemetery are organized as part of the European Day of Jewish Culture.

Places are limited, registration is required.

Oct
18
Sun
Synagogue exhibit guided tour @ Old Synagogue, Essen Germany
Oct 18 @ 15:00 – 16:00
Synagogue exhibit guided tour @ Old Synagogue, Essen Germany | Essen | Nordrhein-Westfalen | Germany

A tour of the permanent exhibition Jewish history and heritage in the Old Synagogue, Essen.

The exhibition has five different subject areas: “sources of Jewish tradition;  Jewish festivals;  the Jewish way of life;  the history of the building; and the history of the Jewish community in Essen.

Registration is not required, by visitors must wear face masks and maintain social distance rules.

Aside from the tour,  the permanent exhibition is open from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

(The featured photo is by Baikonur, via wikimedia commons CC BY-SA 3.0)

 

Synagogue tour @ Koln syagogue
Oct 18 @ 15:00 – 16:30

Guided tour of the synagogue on Roonstrasse, Cologne, the only surviving synagogue of the five that once stood in the city.

 

Tickets must be booked here — https://www.koelnticket.de/exklusive+f%c3%bchrung+j%c3%bcdische+synagoge+nur+buchbar+%c3%bcber+die+hotline+02212801+neues+datum-ticket-67/?evid=2334775&referer_info=hl&tId=&pageId=67

May
19
Wed
Jewish Bialystok virtual tour @ Online event
May 19 @ 19:00 – 20:00
Jewish Bialystok virtual tour @ Online event

Take a a virtual tour of Bialystok with Tomasz Wisniewski, an expert in Jewish history of Podlasie region, who will guide viewers through the city space and history of Bialystok, a home to Jewish community from the mid-17th century. Join in to listen to the history of Jewish community of Bialystok: its role in the rapid development of the town in the 19th century, social and cultural life in early 20th century, and the fate of Jews during Soviet and Nazi occupation.

The tour is part of the regular “Zoom in” program of the Forum for Dialogue NGO.

Wisniewski has been working for more than 30 years to preserve the memory of the Jewish communities of Poland’s eastern borderland. He created the web site jewishbialystok.pl as an online museum of Jewish history in the region and he received the POLIN museum award in 2018.

He has written several books, including a guidebook to Jewish Bialystok and surroundings, and on his YouTube channel  you can find more than 2,000 films presenting Jewish history of the region. He has documented Jewish cemeteries and runs the site bagnowka.pl, which collects data on almost 40,000  tombstones, mainly Jewish ones, and also presents other heritage information.

Click here to register

 

 

Jun
25
Fri
Krakow Jewish Culture Festival @ Online event also on-site
Jun 25 – Jul 4 all-day
Krakow Jewish Culture Festival @ Online event also on-site | Kraków | Małopolskie | Poland

The 30th Krakow Jewish Culture Festival will take place on-site and also on-line.

Live-streamed events can be accessed on the new website: 30.jewishfestival.pl

They include the events held in the JCF Tent, concerts organized in the Museum of Urban Engineering, Collegium Maius and the Tempel synagogue.

After the end of the live stream, they will be able to be accessed in the event archives.

Click here to see the Festival program

Apr
30
Sat
Open Jewish Homes @ Netherlands
Apr 30 – May 4 all-day

The annual “Open Jewish Homes” Holocaust commemoration event in more than a dozen towns and cities in the Netherlands.

Small-scale, locally organized commemorative events takes place in homes where Jews (or members of the resistance) lived before, during, or just after World War II.

The web site states:

The focus is on Jewish life in these houses beforeduring and immediately after the war. History comes to life during Open Jewish Homes. Direct witnesses, descendants and connoisseurs tell stories about persecution, resistance and liberation on the basis of photographs, films, diary fragments, poems, literature and music. […]

The Jewish Cultural Quarter organised in 2012 the first edition of Open Jewish Homes in Amsterdam. Since then local work groups have been organising Open Jewish Homes in various other cities in the country as well. Everyone is free to initiate Open Jewish Homes in his or her place of residence. 

Home page of the Dutch Interactive Holocaust Memorial 

Open Jewish Homes was conceived as a way to engage “in real life” with the interactive Digital Monument to the Jewish Community in the Netherlands, which personalizes the more than 104,000 victims of Holocaust in the Netherlands. Every victim has a personal page  — with their home address as well as photos and other material. 

Click here to see the program in the various locations

 

May
12
Thu
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University
May 12 all-day
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University | Rostock | Mecklenburg-Vorpommern | Germany

This workshop explores spatial aspects of the experiences of German-Jews during 1930s, in Germany and in transit. In highlighting the convoluted relations between place and identity—and the essential influence of these relations on the history of emotions, thoughts and culture—the workshop focuses on the spaces that shaped German-Jewish self-perceptions in the face of National Socialism. While the workshop discusses specific locations, it also examines the concepts of space and place as analytical tools to enhance the historical understanding of Jewish life under Nazi rule and Jewish responses to Nazi persecution. In so doing, the workshop seeks to scrutinize and complicate recent trends in the study of German-Jewish history.

The Keynote Lecture will be given by Professor Marion Kaplan, a renowned researcher of German-Jewish history in modern times and one of the first to address questions of place and space in the experience of German Jews under Nazism.

Organisers: David Jünger (Universität Rostock), Ofer Ashkenazi (The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History), Björn Siegel (Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden) und Katrin Steffen (Sussex Weidenfeld Institut of Jewish Studies)

This workshop takes place IN PERSON. To comply with current regulations to contain the Covid-19 pandemic, please register in advance by contacting Dr. David Jünger (david.juenger@uni-rostock.de).

 

PROGRAM

Thursday, 12 May

12:30–13:00
Introduction

13:00–15:00
1. Creating Spaces of Memory

Gerald Lamprecht (Graz)
Entangled Memories. Jewish and non-Jewish Discourses on the Great War in Interwar Austria

Katrin Steffen (Brighton)
East German-Jewish Spaces in Berlin. Jewish Heritage Societies (Heimatvereine) and their diasporic milieu in the 1930ies

Joachim Schlör (Southampton)
Brückenallee 33, Berlin

15:30-17:30
2. Being In-Between

David Jünger (Rostock)
From Myth to Reality. German Jews Discover Palestine (1933–1938)

Charlie Knight (Southampton)
Mapping your coordinates. Space and Transnationality in Refugee Correspondence

Björn Siegel (Hamburg/Graz)
Ships to Nowhere. A Maritime Space and Its Relevance to Decode Jewish Refugees’ experiences in the 1930s

18:00-19:30
Keynote Lecture

Marion Kaplan (New York)
The Emotional Dissonance of Spaces. German Jewish Refugees in Portugal

Hörsaal 218, Universitätshauptgebäude, Universitätsplatz 1

 

 

Friday 13 May

09:00-11:30
3. Vanishing Jewish Spaces

Guy Miron (Jerusalem)
Synagogues, Cemeteries, Sports facilities. Jewish spaces and places in Nazi Germany

Teresa Walch (Greensboro)
Rendering Germany ‘judenrein’: Space, Ideology, and German Jews in the 1930s

Kim Wünschmann (Hamburg)
Filming the destruction of the Munich Main Synagogue in June 1938. A spatial history-approach to the reading of visual sources

Miriam Rürup (Potsdam)
Dejudaization before Deportation. The removal of Jewish traces in urban topographies of German cities

12:00-14:00
4. Visualizing Jewish Spaces

Robert Mueller-Stahl (Potsdam)
Capturing crisis. German-Jewish private travel photography between the Weimar Republic and Nazism

Sarah Wobick-Segev (Hamburg)
Being and Not Being in Time and Place

Ofer Aschkenazi (Tel Aviv)
The Displacement of the Ordinary. The German-Jewish Home in Photography Narratives of Emigration

14:15-15:30
Round table: Final Discussion
with Sandwich lunch

 

May
14
Sat
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University
May 14 all-day
Space and Place in the German-Jewish Experience of the 1930s @ Rostock University | Rostock | Mecklenburg-Vorpommern | Germany

This workshop explores spatial aspects of the experiences of German-Jews during 1930s, in Germany and in transit. In highlighting the convoluted relations between place and identity—and the essential influence of these relations on the history of emotions, thoughts and culture—the workshop focuses on the spaces that shaped German-Jewish self-perceptions in the face of National Socialism. While the workshop discusses specific locations, it also examines the concepts of space and place as analytical tools to enhance the historical understanding of Jewish life under Nazi rule and Jewish responses to Nazi persecution. In so doing, the workshop seeks to scrutinize and complicate recent trends in the study of German-Jewish history.

The Keynote Lecture will be given by Professor Marion Kaplan, a renowned researcher of German-Jewish history in modern times and one of the first to address questions of place and space in the experience of German Jews under Nazism.

Organisers: David Jünger (Universität Rostock), Ofer Ashkenazi (The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History), Björn Siegel (Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden) und Katrin Steffen (Sussex Weidenfeld Institut of Jewish Studies)

This workshop takes place IN PERSON. To comply with current regulations to contain the Covid-19 pandemic, please register in advance by contacting Dr. David Jünger (david.juenger@uni-rostock.de).

 

PROGRAM

Thursday, 12 May

12:30–13:00
Introduction

13:00–15:00
1. Creating Spaces of Memory

Gerald Lamprecht (Graz)
Entangled Memories. Jewish and non-Jewish Discourses on the Great War in Interwar Austria

Katrin Steffen (Brighton)
East German-Jewish Spaces in Berlin. Jewish Heritage Societies (Heimatvereine) and their diasporic milieu in the 1930ies

Joachim Schlör (Southampton)
Brückenallee 33, Berlin

15:30-17:30
2. Being In-Between

David Jünger (Rostock)
From Myth to Reality. German Jews Discover Palestine (1933–1938)

Charlie Knight (Southampton)
Mapping your coordinates. Space and Transnationality in Refugee Correspondence

Björn Siegel (Hamburg/Graz)
Ships to Nowhere. A Maritime Space and Its Relevance to Decode Jewish Refugees’ experiences in the 1930s

18:00-19:30
Keynote Lecture

Marion Kaplan (New York)
The Emotional Dissonance of Spaces. German Jewish Refugees in Portugal

Hörsaal 218, Universitätshauptgebäude, Universitätsplatz 1

 

 

Friday 13 May

09:00-11:30
3. Vanishing Jewish Spaces

Guy Miron (Jerusalem)
Synagogues, Cemeteries, Sports facilities. Jewish spaces and places in Nazi Germany

Teresa Walch (Greensboro)
Rendering Germany ‘judenrein’: Space, Ideology, and German Jews in the 1930s

Kim Wünschmann (Hamburg)
Filming the destruction of the Munich Main Synagogue in June 1938. A spatial history-approach to the reading of visual sources

Miriam Rürup (Potsdam)
Dejudaization before Deportation. The removal of Jewish traces in urban topographies of German cities

12:00-14:00
4. Visualizing Jewish Spaces

Robert Mueller-Stahl (Potsdam)
Capturing crisis. German-Jewish private travel photography between the Weimar Republic and Nazism

Sarah Wobick-Segev (Hamburg)
Being and Not Being in Time and Place

Ofer Aschkenazi (Tel Aviv)
The Displacement of the Ordinary. The German-Jewish Home in Photography Narratives of Emigration

14:15-15:30
Round table: Final Discussion
with Sandwich lunch

 

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