Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Sep
17
Tue
Jewish cemetery clean-up summer camp @ Jewish cemetery Chernivtsi
Sep 17 – Sep 29 all-day
Jewish cemetery clean-up summer camp @ Jewish cemetery Chernivtsi | Chernivtsi | Chernivets'ka oblast | Ukraine

The 10th anniversary of this “summer camp” for people aged 40 and over, initiated in 2009..

A main part is volunteer clean-up in the vast Jewish cemetery, which with 50,000 graves, is one of the largest preserved Jewish cemeteries in Europe, damaged in some areas and largely neglected. Participants will pull up weeds and undergrowth, clear overgrown paths between the graves and discover forgotten inscriptions on the gravestones.

See details on the Action Reconciation web site

 

Oct
27
Sun
Cemetery clean-up @ Budapest Kozma utca Jewish cemetery
Oct 27 @ 10:00 – 15:00
Cemetery clean-up @ Budapest Kozma utca Jewish cemetery | Budapest | Hungary

Clean-up and maintenance operation at Budapest’s main Jewish cemetery, with the participation of around 30 students from the city’s Scheiber Jewish school. The students will work in groups of 10 on three different areas of the cemetery,  documenting, cleaning and re-painting the signage of the cemetery’s rows. 

 

Dec
10
Tue
Synagogues as Museums and Galleries in East‐Central Europe @ Grande Synagogue of Europe, Brussels
Dec 10 @ 18:00 – 21:00
Synagogues as Museums and Galleries in East‐Central Europe @ Grande Synagogue of Europe, Brussels | Bruxelles | Bruxelles | Belgium

The opening of a photo exhibition by Rudolf Klein that presents a brief survey of synagogues converted into museums and galleries in Hungary, Austria, Bosnia‐Herzegovina, Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Slovakia. The exhibit runs until January 16, 2020.

The opening includes talks (in English) by Klein, Polish researcher Natalia Romik,  and Professor Thomas Gergely.

Prior registration is required.  Click here

The event is organized in collaboration with the Great Synagogue of Europe, the Balassi Institute, the Polish Institute and the Austrian Cultural Forum.

Jan
28
Tue
Eugen Bárkány, a pioneer in Jewish heritage preservation in Slovakia @ Leo Baeck Institute, New York
Jan 28 @ 18:30 – 20:00
Eugen Bárkány, a pioneer in Jewish heritage preservation in Slovakia @ Leo Baeck Institute, New York | New York | New York | United States

 

Dr. Maroš Borský, director of the Jewish Community Museum in Bratislava, Slovakia will give an overview of the remarkable life of Jewish heritage pioneer Eurgen Bárkány, the collection he built, and its future. He will also discuss current synagogue restoration projects in Slovakia and major achievements of the past decade.

Eugen Bárkány (1885–1967) was a civil engineer and successful entrepreneur during the interwar period – and passionate collector in Eastern Slovakia. In 1928, he became a director of the Slovakia´s first Jewish museum in Prešov, which was a private initiative of the Jewish museum association, which Bárkány chaired. The museum assembled a remarkable collection, which survived the war and from 1952–1993 was stored at the State Jewish Museum in Prague, before it was returned to the Jewish Community of Prešov.

Bárkány hid in Budapest in 1942–1945 and returned to Prešov in 1945, where he was subsequently persecuted by the Communist regime, which expelled him from his city. In 1955, Bárkány settled down in Bratislava, where he lived in humble conditions. He continued his survey of Jewish heritage and travelled extensively around Slovakia. In Bratislava, Bárkány assembled another Judaica collection in the Neolog synagogue, and in 1966 a new Jewish museum was planned. This project was not fulfilled, the synagogue was demolished in 1969 and the collection deposited at the Slovak National Museum, from where it returned only in 2002. In 2012, the Jewish Community Museum was established in Bratislava´s only synagogue, which remains in use as an Orthodox house of worship. Since 2016, the Eugen Bárkány Prize has been awarded annually for achievements in Jewish heritage preservation by the Federation of Jewish Communities in Slovakia.

The Jewish Community Museum in Bratislava dedicated in 2018 and 2019 two exhibition projects to Eugen Bárkány and Slovakia´s first Jewish museum in Prešov. The precious collection has remained in the research and exhibition focus of the Museum.

 – – – –

A native of Bratislava, Dr. Maroš Borský studied art history and Jewish studies in Bratislava, Regensburg, London, Jerusalem, and Heidelberg. From 2001 to 2006, Dr. Borský was the curator at the Slovak National Museum-Museum of Jewish Culture, where he founded and oversaw Synagoga Slovaca, the documentation project of synagogue architecture in Slovakia. Dr. Borský is the director of the Jewish Community Museum and Jewish Cultural Institute in Bratislava.

Feb
13
Thu
Guided tour @ Lisbon synagogue
Feb 13 @ 14:45 – 17:00
Guided tour @ Lisbon synagogue | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

A guided tour of the Shaare Tikva synagogue in Lisbon.

Inaugurated in 1904 and designed by Miguel Ventura Terra, the synagogue was the first synagogue to be built in Portugal since the 15th century. Its facade faces an inner courtyard because at the time the state banned non-Catholic houses of worship from fronting on the street.

Register online by following the provided link.

 

Mar
30
Mon
Iconography of Subotica synagogue @ Jewish University/Rabbinical Seminary Budapest
Mar 30 @ 18:00 – 19:30
Iconography of Subotica synagogue @ Jewish University/Rabbinical Seminary Budapest | Budapest | Hungary

A talk by by László Márk Negyela on the iconography of the art nouveau synagogue in Subotica, Serbia, designed by the Hungarian architects Komor and Jakab. (In Hungarian)

Apr
20
Tue
“Judapest”: Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event
Apr 20 @ 18:00 – 19:30
"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle @ Online Zoom event

Lecture by Michael Miller, of CEU

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more “Jewish” than “Hungarian.”  Budapest was Europe’s fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated — and sometimes appalled — contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary’s capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

The evening will be chaired by Professor Mark E. Smith, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Southampton. It will be hosted by Professor Mark Cornwall (University of Southampton, Parkes Institute)

The event will be held on Zoom. Please register by Monday 19th April 16:00 here:

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/parkes/news/events/2021/04/20-parkes-lecture-2021.page

Speaker biography: Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university’s Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

May
23
Sun
Jewish cemetery cleanup in Tallya, Hungary @ Jewish cemetery Tallya
May 23 – May 24 all-day
Jewish cemetery cleanup in Tallya, Hungary @ Jewish cemetery Tallya | Tállya | Hungary

Budapest-based researcher and activist Bence Illyés and his “Magyarországi Haszid Zarándoklatokért” Foundation are organizing a two-day clean-up action at the Jewish cemetery in Tállya, eastern Hungary.

The action will be carried-out under the religious supervision of Mazsihisz, the umbrella organization of the Hungarian Neolog Jewish communities.

All those interested in participating can write to: csodakvandorai@gmail.com

Click here to see more about the project (and donate)

Nov
28
Sun
Budapest cemetery clean-up @ Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery
Nov 28 @ 09:00 – 13:00
Budapest cemetery clean-up @ Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery | Budapest | Hungary

Join a volunteer clean up at Budapest’s monumental Salgotarjani ut Jewish cemetery, organized as a “Mitzvah Day” project by the Hungarian Maccabi sports organization.

Aug
28
Sun
Koszeg synagogue opening-exhibit @ Koszeg, Hungary synagogue
Aug 28 @ 15:00 – Aug 29 @ 19:00
Koszeg synagogue opening-exhibit @ Koszeg, Hungary synagogue | Kőszeg | Hungary

The long-derelict 19th century synagogue in Kőszeg, western Hungary, is reopening to the public after a full-scale renovation that took place over the past two years. The synagogue, which is owned by the state, will become a cultural centre but also will be able to be used for religious services.

JHE’s Ruth Ellen Gruber is on the program of its first public event, Sunday August 28-29 — the opening of an exhibition about Philip (Fülöp) Schey (1798-1881), a Jewish philanthropist born in Kőszeg (known in German as Güns), who had grown rich as a textile merchant and later became a banker for the Hapsburgs. In 1859, Emperor Franz Joseph raised Schey to the Hungarian nobility — he was the first Jew to receive this honor and took the title Philip Schey von Koromla.

The exhibit is called “A Kőszeg Success Story: the Schey Family,” and it presents Philip Schey’s family, life and work: his economic and philanthropic activities, as well as his founding of institutions.

It begins at 3 p.m. and is organized by iAsk — the Institute of Advanced Studies in Kőszeg, which has played a role in the restoration of the building.

The opening is part of a two-day series of events, “Synagogue Week in Kőszeg,” including concerts, lectures, guided tours, and book presentations.

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