Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Dec
3
Tue
Jewish field research 2019: theoretical and empirical framework @ Moscow, Jewish Museum & Tolerance Center, and Institute of Slavic studies
Dec 3 – Dec 4 all-day
Jewish field research 2019: theoretical and empirical framework @ Moscow, Jewish Museum & Tolerance Center, and Institute of Slavic studies

The conference will highlight issues related to the peculiarities of the organization of field research and work in modern Jewish communities of the post-Soviet space.

Organizers: Jewish Museum and tolerance center, Center of Slavic -Jewish Studies Of the Institute of Slavic studies RAS, Center “Sefer”

Venue: Jewish Museum and tolerance center; Institute of Slavic studies, 32 A Leninsky Prospekt, building B, auditorium 901

The specificity of the “Jewish” field will be discussed, and a review of new research in the field of Jewish archaeology, anthropology, folklore, linguistics, sociology and epigraphy will be held.

We will talk about the results of the summer season 2019, prospects and plans for new research.

At the end of the conference, participants will present new collections of articles and monographs based on field materials of recent years.

Entrance to the conference is strictly by registration.

If you have questions, contact sefer@sefer.ru

Dec
17
Tue
Jewish itineraries in Romania film @ Bucharest, Romanian National History Museum
Dec 17 @ 18:00 – 19:00
Jewish itineraries in Romania film @ Bucharest, Romanian National History Museum | București | Municipiul București | Romania

Screening of the film Jewish Routes in Romania, a documentary about Jewish heritage sites in the country.

According to a press release:

Jewish itineraries in Romania is a documentary film that captures a small part of the traces left by the Jewish communities in Romania. From Săpânţa to Ştefăneşti, from Bacău to Siret, the film crew tried to recover the atmosphere in the visited cemeteries and synagogues. Hard to locate, remaining outside the tourist circuit of many localities in Romania, the Jewish cemeteries are in an accelerated process of degradation, although they represent an invaluable heritage. And in the few synagogues that remained functional in Romania, only a handful of people celebrate the old beliefs.

For over 40 minutes, the viewer can admire unique funeral stones or synagogues painted in an impressive manner. Botoşani, Bucureşti, Câmpulung Moldovenesc, Fălticeni, Săpânţa, Ştefăneşti, Suceava, Dorohoi, Piatra Neamt, Sighetu Marmaiei, Simleu Silvaniei, Buhuşi, Târgu Neamţ, Sighet, Siret, Rădăuţi and Bacău, are the following localities: they revealed a flourishing world, a Jewish world that used to call Romania’s territory home.

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