Jewish Heritage Europe

Calendar

Jan
25
Thu
Sataniv: the lost world of the ancient Jewish cemetery @ “Jewish Memory and Holocaust in Ukraine" Museum
Jan 25 – Mar 3 all-day
Sataniv: the lost world of the ancient Jewish cemetery @ “Jewish Memory and Holocaust in Ukraine" Museum | Dnipro | Dnipropetrovs'ka oblast | Ukraine

An exhibition of art-enhanced photographs by Dmytro Polyukhovich based on the carvings on the centuries-old matzevot in the Jewish cemetery in Sataniv (which unfortunately has suffered extensive damage in recent years by a self-appointed Haredi man claiming to restore it).

The images for the exhibition focus on specific details of the carved iconography, which combines religious tradition with folk art — floral motifs, animals (and imaginary animals), symbols, religious allegories, and more.

To create the exhibition pieces, Polyukovich manipulated his original photos of the matzevot in Adobe Photoshop, cutting away everything except for the specific detail of the carving  that he wanted to highlight and then adding color.

NOTE: The exhibition will be open every Wednesday and every Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. It is also possible to organize group tours every Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday.

 

Neviditelné synagogy – Invisible Synagogues @ Brána Trojzemí, Hrádek nad Nisou
Jan 25 – Mar 31 all-day
Neviditelné synagogy - Invisible Synagogues @ Brána Trojzemí, Hrádek nad Nisou | Liberecký kraj | Czechia

The latest edition of the exhibit Neviditelné Synagogy — Invisible Synagogues, photographs by Štěpán Bartoš.  

Bartoš photographs the blank spaces in the Czech Republic where destroyed synagogues once stood and adds a ghostly silhouette of the destroyed synagogue to the exhibition photos of the places where they once stood.

On the Invisible Synagogues project web site (which is in German and Czech) you can see galleries of his photos, without the added silhouette, arranged according to region. They include sites in big cities, small towns, and tiny villages; there are fields and rural spaces as well as modern buildings, crowded city streets, and even artificial lakes.

Read our November 2021 post about his Invisible Synagogues project.

 

Comments are closed.