Calendar

Oct
23
Mon
Jewish Heritage Tourism in the Digital Age @ Venice
Oct 23 @ 10:00 – Oct 25 @ 17:00

Registration is Required — Click here to register

Click here to see program

The challenges and opportunities posed by Jewish heritage tourism and travel in Europe are the focus of this three-day conference and raise many important issues both in places where there is an active local Jewish population and in places where there are sites of Jewish heritage but no organized Jewish community.

The conference will focus on issues that reflect the growing diversity and energy of Jewish and Jewish-themed tourism in Europe, both for Jews and for others. But it would also address both the specifics of Jewish heritage tourism and how it fits within heritage tourism/travel in general. Special emphasis will be given to the ways in which technology influences and possibly changes Jewish heritage tourism.

This conference is the latest in a series of international conferences on Jewish heritage and follows on from a number of major international conferences on Jewish built heritage issues that have taken place since 1990.

 

Purposes:

  • To bring together thinkers, practitioners, professionals of Jewish heritage tourism, inspire the next generation of caretakers of Jewish sites, and strengthen a Europe-wide network of people involved in Jewish heritage tourism;
  • To make connections across borders, while acknowledging the local specificities;
  • To present innovative and successful projects that are not necessarily fully replicable in a different context, but that can inspire others.

 

 

Nov
9
Thu
The Value of Museum Collections @ Ghent, Belgium (Various venues)
Nov 9 @ 18:30 – Nov 12 @ 12:00

The annual conference of NEMO, the Network of European Museums Organizations.

Museum experts from all over Europe will present museum concepts and projects reaching into political and social spheres or opening up collections to participative, modern and exceptional approaches. Museums need to deal with new tasks, new challenges and opportunities within a digital and diverse society, preserving intangible heritage, representing diverse and shared heritage. These tasks have to be met with changing resources, structures, expertise and skill sets to make sure collections are accessible for current and future audiences.

Additionally, this year’s conference offers various hands-on workshops that look into different aspects collection handling. NEMO also offers the unique opportunity to connect to European museum-related projects and initiatives during a EU Project Slam.

Click to see program

 

 

 

Nov
19
Sun
AEJM Annual conference @ Sephardic Museum Toledo
Nov 19 @ 10:00 – Nov 21 @ 13:00

The Association of European Jewish Museums Conference 2017 will be hosted by the Sephardic Museum of Toledo, Spain, on 19-21 November. There will be an optional evening programme on 18 November and an optional excursion on 22 November.

Click here to read about the programme, conference fees, and hotel discounts.

AEJM Conferences are held in a different European venue on an annual basis to enable members to connect and learn more about each others collections, exhibitions, and curatorial and educational work. Each Conference offers keynote lectures, panel discussions, workshops, project presentations and excursions. The Annual General Meeting of the AEJM, which is attended by all members also takes place at our Annual Conference.

This year’s conference is kindly hosted by the Museo Sefardí. The Museum was created by Royal Decree in 1964 and is housed in a historical building, the synagogue of Samuel ha-Leví, in the Jewish Quarter in Toledo.

 

 

Mar
5
Mon
Jewish country house conference @ TORCH, Oxford University
Mar 5 @ 09:00 – 18:00

This workshop aims to establish the Jewish country house both as a focus for scholarly research and as a site of European memory. By focusing on a hitherto unidentified group of country houses – those that were owned, renewed and sometimes built by Jews – we aim to establish the importance of Jewish country houses like Port Lympne Mansion, Schloss Freienwalde, Villa Kerylos and Castello Sonnino as variations of a pan-European phenomenon deserving serious consideration from an academic and a heritage viewpoint.

Jewish country houses have so far escaped systematic study because they do not fit existing paradigms either in modern Jewish history or country house studies. The historiography of European Jewish elites has tended to focus on the grande bourgeoisie in its urban setting and does not consider the role families like the Bischoffsheims, the Bleichröders, the Péreires and the Sonninos assumed through their rural estates, nor the role of Jewish country houses in the self-fashioning of many leading Jewish figures such as Benjamin Disraeli, Ferdinand de Rothschild and Philip Sassoon in the UK, Leopoldo Franchetti in Italy, Walter Rathenau in Germany, and Théodor Reinach in France. Conversely, the literature on country houses, which typically focuses on the landed aristocracy, has paid little or no attention to the existence of country houses and rural estates in Jewish hands, or to the particular challenges this posed in a rural landscape and social context so powerfully shaped by Christianity.

Click here to view the call for papers.
 

Contact name: 
Oliver Cox
Contact email: 
Mar
6
Tue
Jewish country house conference @ TORCH, Oxford University
Mar 6 @ 09:00 – 18:00

This workshop aims to establish the Jewish country house both as a focus for scholarly research and as a site of European memory. By focusing on a hitherto unidentified group of country houses – those that were owned, renewed and sometimes built by Jews – we aim to establish the importance of Jewish country houses like Port Lympne Mansion, Schloss Freienwalde, Villa Kerylos and Castello Sonnino as variations of a pan-European phenomenon deserving serious consideration from an academic and a heritage viewpoint.

Jewish country houses have so far escaped systematic study because they do not fit existing paradigms either in modern Jewish history or country house studies. The historiography of European Jewish elites has tended to focus on the grande bourgeoisie in its urban setting and does not consider the role families like the Bischoffsheims, the Bleichröders, the Péreires and the Sonninos assumed through their rural estates, nor the role of Jewish country houses in the self-fashioning of many leading Jewish figures such as Benjamin Disraeli, Ferdinand de Rothschild and Philip Sassoon in the UK, Leopoldo Franchetti in Italy, Walter Rathenau in Germany, and Théodor Reinach in France. Conversely, the literature on country houses, which typically focuses on the landed aristocracy, has paid little or no attention to the existence of country houses and rural estates in Jewish hands, or to the particular challenges this posed in a rural landscape and social context so powerfully shaped by Christianity.

Click here to view the call for papers.
 

Contact name: 
Oliver Cox
Contact email: