Jewish Heritage Europe

Photo Essay: On the 100th anniversary of the end of WW1, honoring the Jewish soldiers who fell (on all sides)

Memorial to fallen WW1 soldiers, Jewish cemetery, Iasi, Romania

 

Today, November 11, marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.

We remember the Jewish soldiers who fell during the conflict — and, in particular, we take a look at the memorials raised in their honor. 

Jews fought on all sides in the “War to End All Wars” — and a number of Jewish cemeteries in Europe have memorials to Jewish soldiers who were killed. Some are grandiose sculptures; some are fields of gravestones; some are more modest monuments, or individual gravestones. There are also memorial plaques at synagogues — and even a memorial “Heroes Temple” in Budapest.

Here are some of them — you can see more in our expanding gallery of these images. (There is also a Facebook group of such memorial photos.)

 

Saluzzo, Italy. Grave of Capt. Lelio Levi, who “fell on the field of honor,” Feb. 22, 1916

 

Florence, Italy – in the garden of the synagogue

 

Berlin’s Field of Honor for Jewish Soldiers Killed in World War I. Weissensee cemetery. Photo: Samuel D. Gruber, 2016

 

Berlin’s Field of Honor for Jewish Soldiers Killed in World War I. Weissensee cemetery. Photo: Samuel D. Gruber, 2016

 

Roll of Honour list in Garnethill synagogue, Glasgow, Scotland

 

Grave of Frederick Charles Emanuel, in the Jewish cemetery, Southampton, England

 

Memorial on the outer wall of the Levantine synagogue, Venice

 

Bucharest, Romania

 

Dun-sur-Meuse, France. Grave of Rudolph Fuldauer, German, in the Deutscher Soldatenfriedhof. Photo © Jay Osborn

 

In the Jewish cemetery, Boskovice, Czech Republic

 

The Heroes Synagogue, Budapest. Built in 1931 to honor Jewish soldiers who fell in WW1

 

Monument in the Sephardic Jewish cemetery, Belgrade

 

Jewish cemetery, Gliwice, Poland (at time of WW1 was Gleiwitz, Germany)

 

Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, France. Grave of Hyman Rosenberg, American. Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery Photo © Jay Osborn

 

Jewish cemetery, Trebic, CZ

 

Gura Humorului, Romania. The Latin letters at the top of the stone read (in Romanian) “World War”

 

Suceava, Romania. New Jewish cemetery

 

Haudainville, France. Amédée Rothstein and Abraham Schronn, French Nécropole Nationale de Haudainville. Both “died for France” 8/8/1916 Photo © Jay Osborn

 

Bielsko Biala, Poland

 

 

 

7 comments on “Photo Essay: On the 100th anniversary of the end of WW1, honoring the Jewish soldiers who fell (on all sides)

  1. The synagogue in Kolin, Czech Republic, has a memorial plaque to members of congregation who died in WW1. In May 2018 the Kolin Museum mounted an extensive exhibition on Jews of the town who served and died in the war. It also covered local hospitals who treated the wounded…run by Jewish doctors.

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